Red cabbage or Pink cabbage

We harvested our first red cabbage this week!  Look what a pretty cabbage it is.  But it's definitely a pink cabbage, not a red cabbage.  Who ever named them red cabbages?  Pretty, pretty pink! Or is it purple? or Magenta? Or Fuchsia? Or violet? or.....



I made a coleslaw, of course - as we eat a lot of coleslaw in this household.



Along with the "pink" cabbage there are:

  • spring onions/scallions
  • sugar snap peas
  • raisins
  • carrots
and a dijon mustard  fat free dressing.

It was delicious as well as colorful!



Today  I used the coleslaw in coleslaw tacos, topped with hemp seeds.  


So what color was the last "red" cabbage you ate? Red? Pink? Purple?

Cabbage is a cruciferous vegetable, and the red/pink color shows its full of anthocyanins, which are anti-oxidants and also anti-inflammatory. Cabbage also has anti-cancer activity, but it's consuming a variety of vegetables that has the most health benefits....as shown in this video:




So don't forget to eat a rainbow a day
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Rainbow of Roasted Vegetables

Look at my lovely colorful dinner! Roasted veggies.


The cool pink and white stripes are chioggia beets.  If you roast them whole, they maintain their wonderful stripes inside. If you cut them before cooking, they lose their stripes.


Along with the beets are carrots, broccolini, mushrooms, roast parsnips (can't get enough of those) and then at the front of the picture are wonderful purple potatoes!


Nearly a rainbow of food in one meal. Do you eat a rainbow a day?  See the PCRM chart below which shows the cancer-fighting and immune boosting power of different colored foods.



The more naturally colorful your meal is, the more likely it is to have an abundance of carotenoids as well as other health nutrients.  Carotenoids are the pigments that give fruits and vegetables, such as carrots, sweet potatoes, and tomatoes, their bright colors.  Beta-carotene, lycopene and lutein are all different varieties of carotenoids that act as antioxidants with strong anti-cancer properties.
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Healing Trees

As I mentioned last week, I am participating in the Ceres Cancer Journey event this Sunday in Santa Rosa.

I will be in the resource room, and for some of the time, I will be doing a short cooking demo.

I will be making these little "healing trees", a recipe that I developed myself.


They are made with green tea, almonds, dates, ginger, and lemon. I'll post the recipe here next week after the demo.

The healing qualities of these bite-size morsels include:  the green tea has excellent anti-cancer  properties and is high in anti-oxidants;  the ginger and dates both help to settle the stomach and calm digestive issues;  the lemon is a great source of anti-oxidants, vitamins and minerals; and the almonds are a good source of easily digestible fiber, vitamins and minerals.

AND the cute shape of the trees lifts your spirits!



I hope if you are in the area that you will call by for the event and hear some wonderful speakers and experience nurturing, love and good food.

If you attend, do come and find me in the resource room.

Ceres Cancer Journey Event
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Anti-cancer - a new way of life

One of my favorite books about cancer is "Anticancer - A New way of life " by Dr David Servan-Schreiber.  He got brain cancer at an early age and set out to understand the complex inner workings of the body's natural cancer-fighting capabilities. The book is both a moving personal story and also exposes the facts on the roles that environment, lifestyle and trauma play in our health.

The books is a wonderful preventive book for all of us, as well as a healing book for those with cancer.

Here's an interview with Dr S.S:



I highly recommend everyone read his book.
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Food as Medicine - Turmeric

Turmeric is a rhizome plant of the ginger family.  The rhizomes (roots) are boiled for several hours, then dried and ground to produce a bright yellow powder.  This powder is the principal spice in Indian, Persian and Thai curries.  It is also one of the most common ingredients used in ayruvedic medicine for its anti-inflammatory properties. No other food ingredient has such a powerful anti-inflammatory effect.


The principle molecule responsible for this effect is Curcumin.  In laboratory studies, in addition to its general antiinflammatory effect, curcumin also inhibits growth in a large number of cancers including colon, prostate, lung, liver, stomach, breast, ovarian, brain and leukemia.

At the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, scientists have studied turmeric as they would any new pharmaceutical.  While there were some skeptics that such positive lab results came from a "food", progress has continued and several clinical trials  looking at turmeric as a means to prevent and treat cancer are currently under way.

But before you go out and eat a teaspoon full of turmeric (beware - it's spicy!), this food also illustrates the benefits of culinary traditions in comparison to the consumption of isolated substances.  It has been found that turmeric ingested alone, or in capsules, is very poorly absorbed by the digestive tract. But when it is mixed with black pepper - as it always is in a curry - this increases it's absorption by 2,000 percent!

Recommended usage*:

  • mix 1/4 teaspoon of turmeric with 1/2 teaspoon of olive oil and a generous pinch of black pepper.  Add to soups or salad dressings or pour over cooked vegetables.  If the taste is a little bitter, try adding a few drops of agave nectar too.  
  • sprinkle turmeric and freshly ground pepper on/in hummus or other dips
*This should not be construed as medical advice. 
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