New food of the week: Homemade Pumpkin Gnocchi

Continuing from this morning's blog post - my pumpkin gnocchi are delicious.  Who cares if they aren't the same texture as one's you have had before!  They are my first taste and I really like them.


I boiled them in water and then browned them in just a tiny bit of coconut oil with fresh sage from the garden and dried cranberries.

It's lovely to split them with a fork and see the orange pumpkin color peeking through.


And made from garbanzo flour and psyllium husks, they are a wonderful source of fiber.

As I always tell my students - try a new food every week. You never know what is out there that you will really love.  It's worked today, for sure......and yesterday actually with those rose hip truffles....time to make more of those for friends coming around tomorrow.


Have a great weekend and try something new!


Comments

Making Pumpkin Gnoochi - how should it taste?

I'm making pumpkin Gnocchi!  Its fun to make and fast but I do have one problem.



I've never eaten gnocchi before!  So what does it taste like? What should I be looking for in texture?  You see gnocchi is made with wheat flour - even potato ones have wheat in them and as I can't eat gluten, I've never tried them. In England, I've never even seen them on a menu....maybe they are nowadays, but not when I lived there.  Today I've made some with garbanzo bean flour and pumpkin!


They were quick and I loved rolling, cutting and marking them with a fork.

I guess if I like the taste, that is all that matters...but if you have any tips on the texture I should be going for - let me know!  Can't even ask my hubby as he has had potato gnocchi before but hates pumpkin so wouldn't want these!


I'll be cooking them for my lunch with some fresh sage!  I need some sage advice!



Comments

Crispy Gluten free Flatbread


I made a lovely new flatbread recipe yesterday - with almond flour and flax seed.  I was so pleased with how it came out and the recipe yielded enough to freeze half of it.


I topped it with a pesto sauce with no added oil, some fresh tomatoes, red onion, red pepper and black cumin seeds!  The pesto was made with pumpkin seeds, cilantro, hemp seeds, lime and as I didn't have any spinach, I used some green lettuce!


It was so tasty.  I'll be using this recipe in my Food as Medicine classes next week, so will share it with you after that.



The flatbread is good as a dipping bread too - I can see this being a popular repeat recipe, at least in this household!  Wonder what I'll use as topping next time????
Comments

Quince spice balls

With my vast quantity of quince sauce (see yesterday's post!), I thought I'd make some yummy quince balls today, with autumnal spices.


Here's the recipe.  Instead of quince, you can use any pureed fruit, such as apple sauce, or pumpkin puree or pear puree...but when you have a tree full of quince, you use quince puree!

Quince spice balls
Ingredients: - makes 20 balls

8 dates, pitted
3/4 cup raw walnuts
1/4 cup unsweetened fruit puree
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
Dash ground cloves
1/2 cup unsweetened shredded coconut

Add the pitted dates to a processor and process for a minute or two.  Add the walnuts and process again.  Add the fruit and spices and mix again.  Finally add the coconut and mix thoroughly. At this stage you could also add one of the following optional extras, stirring in by hand, rather than processing. I didn't - and just used the above ingredients.

Optional extras:
1/4 cup raisins
1/4 goji berries

Use a small cookie scoop to scoop the mixture into approximately 20 balls. If it is too sticky, add some more nuts or coconut. If it's too crumbly, add a little more puree.

The balls can be rolled in additional coconut or crushed walnuts.

Place in the refrigerator until chilled and a little firmer.  They will keep for a week, chilled.


The spicy flavors are what make these balls.  Spices are powerful foods and too often neglected in cooking.  When using spices, a combination tends to work better than an individual spice.



The health benefits of cinnamon include:

  • 1/2 teaspoon a day can lower LDL cholesterol
  • cinnamon lowers blood sugar levels and increases insulin production in the body
  • it has anti-fungal properties
  • it has anti-clotting effects on the blood
  • cinnamon added to food is a natural food preservative
  • just smelling cinnamon boosts cognitive function and memory
  • cinnamon is a natural remedy for headaches and migraines


The health benefits of cloves include:

  • cloves contain eugenol which has been seen to be effective in dentistry as a mild anesthetic as well as an anti-bacterial agent
  • eugenol is also anti-inflammatory and a great addition to an anti-inflammatory diet
  • cloves are an excellent source of manganese, omega-3 fatty acids, and very high levels of anti-oxidants


The health benefits of nutmeg include:
  • can have a blood pressure lowering effect
  • can soothe an upset stomach and stop diarrhea
  • can be stimulating to the brain and improve mental function
Culinary spices are also important with cancer as they can inhibit the "master switch" for cancer genes. They do this by blocking a signaling molecule called NF-kappa beta. NF-kB makes cancer cells resistant to treatment or prompts them to behave in a more aggressive manner, so using spices to turn off this molecule can be powerful in cancer treatment.  

Pharmaceutical companies are in the process of developing drugs that are effective NFkB inhibitors, but nature has supplied us with spices that do the same thing.  So look in your spice cupboard and spice up your life.

Comments