The Best Homemade Soy Yogurt


My life has been transformed since I successfully started making organic soy, unsweetened yoghurt!  It makes me so happy. I want to get out of bed in the mornings, just so I can eat some yogurt!  It is so creamy and delicious and only has four ingredients:
  • organic soybeans
  • water
  • organic raw cashews
  • probiotics
The "active" part of making the recipe also takes only about 5 minutes.  Then it sits and ferments for 8 hours, then goes in the fridge - and is then ready to be gobbled up!

So here is the recipe for you to give it a try.  Let me know if it changes your life too!!

Ingredients
3/4 cup raw organic cashews, soaked in water for at least 1 hour, then drained
32 oz carton of WestSoy organic, unsweetened plain soy milk
3 probiotic capsules or 1 scoop probiotic powder. I use Custom probiotics CP1 or their 6 strain powder


1. Put approx. 1 cup of soy milk and the soaked cashews into a blender and process until smooth and creamy.


2. Transfer to a medium saucepan and add the remaining 3 cups of milk.  Whisk to combine.

3. Warm over a low heat, whisking occasionally until the mixture reaches a temperature of 110 degrees F (43 degrees C) or if you don't have a thermometer, until a few drops on your wrist feels slightly warm.  Remove from the heat. Don't let it go above this temperature.



4. Open the probiotic capsules and add the contents into the milk - or add the powder and whisk to thoroughly combine.

5. Pour into a yogurt maker and switch on, for 8 hours. If you don't have a yogurt maker,  leave the mixture to rest in covered jar/pot in a warm place in the kitchen, for 8 hours.  Taste to check the desired degree of tartness in flavor.  If it isn't as tart as you like it, leave it another hour or two.  Then refrigerate - it will thicken more as it cools.

6. Store covered in the refrigerator for upto 2 weeks.

Notes on the recipe:
a) Most non dairy recipes are typically not very thick. Adding the cashews thickens this one nicely, without having to add any other thickeners.

b) I use an infrared thermometer (~$15) to measure the temperature of the milk.  I bought mine a few months ago and love it.  Basically nothing has to touch the food - it just shoots an infrared beam and measures the temperature from that.  No washing up!  It's also fun to play with around the house and check room temperatures, each other, draughts, etc etc!  You can of course use a regular thermometer or do the wrist heat test - but its not as much fun!


c) I haven't tried this with other milks or changed the cashew nuts for another nut.  That's because I love it as it is and if it ain't broke, don't fix it!  If you give it a try with something else, do report back and let me know how it goes.

d) The yogurt machine holds the yogurt at a constant 108F.  If you don't have one, try leaving it in a switched off electric oven with only the inside light switched on. This should give it enough warmth to ferment.  Or just put it in a warm place in the kitchen.  I've tried it both ways and even when I did it side by side, there was no difference.  If the temperature where you leave it is not that warm, you may need to give it 10 - 12 hours to ferment instead of just 8 hours.

e) The probiotic capsules work perfectly.  The company, customprobiotics sells a yogurt starter, but I've never tried it, as I had the probiotics and they work just fine. If your yogurt doesn't ferment, its probably because you have used a different probiotic that isn't "live"!

f) I have only used WestSoy milk for this recipe as it is made from only whole organic, non-GMO soybeans and water. No other ingredients.  It has a high protein level and reasonable fat content.  Don't try fat free as you need the fat to make the yoghurt thicken.


g) Once you've made your first batch, instead of re-inoculating subsequent batches with fresh probiotic every time, you can just keep approx. 1/4 cup of the previous batch of yogurt and add that to the milk and cashews. The bugs will still be alive.  I tend to do this for a few batches, but then start afresh with fresh probiotics every 6 or so times.

h) Sometimes some liquid separates slightly from the yoghurt. You can pour this off or just stir it in.  Your choice, depending on how thick you want the yoghurt.  You can also strain the yogurt and make soft cheese from it too.

i) If it doesn't set or get sour, its probably because your probiotics are no longer active. This should be a spoonable yogurt.


I start my day with my yogurt with added fruit grown in our garden - like pears and figs right now -- and then also use it at other times through the day - add it with some turmeric to steamed cauliflower, make a salad dressing with it. How will you use yours?

Comments (7)

Homemade almond yogurt

After my success with making oat yogurt, I thought I'd try my hand at almond yoghurt. I've tried it before on a few occasions, but it wasn't successful.  The previous methods were using a yogurt starter, specifically for non-dairy products, and a yogurt maker.  But this time I thought I'd just adapt the oat method and use almonds instead.


It produced a delicious creamy yogurt - that just looks like cream.  I fermented it for 12 hours on the back of my range - so a reasonably warm spot and the sourness was as I like it after that time.  After refrigerating, the yogurt thickened up and is a perfect accompaniment to my homemade muesli.

Yoghurt-in-progress - on the back of my range, keeping warm.

The only ingredients in the yogurt are almonds, water and probiotics.  If you look at the labels of bought almond yogurts, they frequently have many chemicals included plus lots of sugar. I don't think this needs any sugar.  At my class yesterday, I let my students taste both the almond and oat yogurt. They preferred the almond - and considered it tastier than any bought non-dairy yogurt.


My previous attempts all resulted in gritty yogurt, which separated a lot and gave more water than yogurt.  This has none of those issues and doesn't even need stirring before use in the morning.
Comments

Gluten Free Oat yogurt

I tried making yoghurt with oats - and it worked! I really like it.

Oat yoghurt in the process

I used whole kernel GF oat groats also known as oat berries,  with some GF rolled oats.   You can find oat kernels in Whole Foods or health food stores, or if you want gluten free ones, Chateau Cream Hill Estates does a gluten free whole kernel oats, which are available for order online from several GF suppliers. Whole kernel oats look a little like brown rice.



I soaked the oats for 8 hours then fermented them on the back of my aga (stove) for 16 hours.  I'm loving it on my oat muesli every morning.  Oats on Oats.  A healthy yogurt! No sugar. No preservatives. Just oats, water and probiotics!

Warming/fermenting on the back of the aga
Want to come round for breakfast and try some?
Comments